Author Topic: Oven baked spray on "paint"  (Read 2237 times)

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Offline John Galt

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Oven baked spray on "paint"
« on: February 08, 2015, 09:10:22 PM »
I was thinking about trying some oven bake/cure paint for an old rusted barreled receiver.  The instructions say to bake in stages up to 600 degrees F. 

How hot can a barreled receiver get before one should worry about structural integrity? Hardness?  I would not think that 250 degrees F would be too much, but 600?

Any thoughts?

John Galt
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Offline Dannyboy53

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Re: Oven baked spray on "paint"
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2015, 09:22:54 PM »
John years ago I worked in several machine shops and on occassion we tempered metals by using various temperatures and materials to quence the metal. but nothing was done with machines in a controled environment...it was a "shade-tree" method! I could be wrong but I would be afraid of baking my barrel/receiver to 600 degrees. That is a substantial temperature that definitely changes colors of bare steel if not changing the molecular structure.

Just my two cents and maybe I should have withheld comment for someone more knowledgeable than I.

Offline John Galt

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Re: Oven baked spray on "paint"
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2015, 09:37:03 PM »
Dannyboy,

I was thinking the same thing.  600 degrees can change things.  I would not want to find out the hard way!

Thanks,

John
When the Cambrian measures were forming, They promised perpetual peace.
They swore, if we gave them our weapons, that the wars of the tribes would cease.
But when we disarmed They sold us and delivered us bound to our foe,
And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: "Stick to the Devil you know."
Rudyard Kipling  1919

Offline Dannyboy53

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Re: Oven baked spray on "paint"
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2015, 09:45:03 PM »
Again John, I could be wrong and someone with some expertise in metallurgy will chime in soon. It just sounds like a bit much to me!!

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Re: Oven baked spray on "paint"
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2015, 10:13:40 PM »
We rely on heat treated metals in my line of business, so I have just about enough experience with it to be dangerous.  That said, I'm certainly no metallurgist, so take what I say with a grain of salt.

Assuming it's a simple carbon steel, this would be what you're dealing with:



You're well below the eutectic at 600F.
You're not crossing into any bizarre phase change realms. 
If it's a non-hardened steel that you're starting with, and assuming you cool from your 600F back down in a nice slow process (like simply turning the oven off and letting the whole system come down), you should return to the exact same point you started from. 

If you started with a hardened steel, all bets are off.  You could re-temper the steel at 600F depending on how long you leave it in the oven at that temperature.
Of course, if it's not a simple low carbon steel all bets are off.  Stainless acts differently, precipitation hardened steel acts differently, exotic alloys always act differently, and of course anything not steel acts differently (some aluminum alloys I work with can be aged at temps as low as 300F.)

Do you even have an oven that will get you to 600F?  That's a bit more than your typical Kenmore can do.  I'd suggest a lower temperature and maybe not a huge dwell time & you'll probably be ok.   thumb1
      

Offline John Galt

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Re: Oven baked spray on "paint"
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2015, 10:24:04 PM »
R-M,

After I posted initially, I thought of the upper temp limit on my "pizza cooker" and I don't think it will do 600.  I will most likely just do a lower temp cure and see how it works.  I would slowly cool to room temp as you said.

Thanks guys!

John
When the Cambrian measures were forming, They promised perpetual peace.
They swore, if we gave them our weapons, that the wars of the tribes would cease.
But when we disarmed They sold us and delivered us bound to our foe,
And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: "Stick to the Devil you know."
Rudyard Kipling  1919

Offline Adam7

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Re: Oven baked spray on "paint"
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2015, 10:39:13 PM »
600 is nothing for a rifle.  They can go double that and still be ok. 

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Re: Oven baked spray on "paint"
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2015, 12:58:55 AM »
Note to self, Self, do not make turbo turbine housings and exhaust manifolds glow red, anymore.  Red is not a happy metal color. thumb1
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Offline Greatguns

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Re: Oven baked spray on "paint"
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2015, 01:50:19 PM »
Referring to the paint you are using, what is it? Dura-coat is a good coating for firearms and I don't even think it requires baking. Gun-kote does, but IIRC the temp requirement on it is only around 350. Gun-kote also seals into the metal. With anything requiring baking though you want to be careful as I have heard it can ruin your oven for cooking use.(odors and toxins)