Author Topic: GB listings - 2016 - Commercial Chinese (AKA What's my Paratrooper worth?)  (Read 2353 times)

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Online running-man

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This post will keep track with a grand running total for all Commercial Chinese SKS variants sold on Gunbroker since the beginning of the year.  While you can't pull individual gun sales info out of the chart you will be able to quickly and easily identify what the going rate is for a specific gun such as a perfect condition, Navy Arms Cowboy's Companion new in the box.  I will update this table after every monthly report.

-RM

Key:
Arsenal Condition:
As-Imported: This gun is in the same configuration it was when it was imported into the United States.  These guns were modified in some way prior to export from China.  They may have been shortened to 16 1/2", been machined to enable an AK style magazine to be installed, received different scopes and scope mounts, or any combination of the three.  Because these have been 'professionally' bubba'd, we no longer track them by factory number or consider them 'as-issued' vs 'refurbished'.  These types of guns can, however, be bubba'd, which would take precedence over this condition if both were seen (i.e. an NR in a plastic stock.)
Bubba: Plastic anything, Tech sights, swapped out handguards, anything drilled and tapped, duracoated/non arsenal painted anything, banana mag w/o the original shown, anything not Chinese on the gun, blatantly obvious hacksaw performed homemade "Paratrooper" modifications, FSB modifications, etc.  It doesn't matter if the gun can be put back close to 'original' condition easily, if it's a bubba gun when it sells, it's a bubba gun.
Uncertain: This is the designator I give when the auction is horsetrashy (not a word) enough for me to not want to guess at arsenal condition.  Photos were blurry, taken from 1000 miles away, or were of parts of the gun that nobody cares about (like 10 shots of the bayonet...hint hint).  Could be a gem or a lump of coal.  Anyone who bought it w/o seeing better photos took a gamble.

Current Condition:
Perfect: In New condition in every aspect.  (Many collectors & dealers use "As New" to describe this condition).  Unfired since import.  Something in this category likely has the box, manual, all accessories, and maybe even the original receipt with it. 
Excellent: New condition, used but little, no noticeable marring of wood or metal, bluing perfect, (except at muzzle or sharp edges).  Fired very little if at all.  Again, these guns typically have the original packaging and all accessories. 
Very Good: In perfect working condition, no appreciable wear on working surfaces, no corrosion or pitting, only minor surface dents or scratches even though the gun has certainly been fired.  May or may not have the box and all accessories. 
Good: In safe working condition, minor wear on working surfaces, no broken parts, no corrosion or pitting that will interfere with proper functioning.  Fired often, likely doesn't have the box, manual or any accessories. 
Fair: In safe working condition but well worn, perhaps requiring replacement of minor parts or adjustments which should be indicated in advertisement, no active rust, but may have corrosion pits which do not render article unsafe or inoperable.  Heavily fired to the point where wear may begin to be an issue.  No box or original accessories. 
Poor: Extensive repair needed; metal deeply pitted with active rust; may have principal lettering, numerals and design obliterated, wood badly scratched, bruised, cracked, or even broken; could be mechanically inoperative; generally undesirable.  Fired to the point of needing barrel replacement.  These type of guns should be checked by a competent gunsmith before usage.
Uncertain: This is the designator I give when the auction is horsetrashy (not a word) enough for me to not want to guess at current condition.  Photos were blurry, taken from 1000 miles away, or were of parts of the gun that nobody cares about (like 10 shots of the bayonet...hint hint).  Could be a gem or a lump of coal.  Anyone who bought it w/o seeing better photos took a gamble.

Click on an image below to see the image in high-res:




« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 11:51:14 PM by running-man »
      

Online Loose}{Cannon

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Re: GB listings - 2015 - Commercial Chinese (AKA What's my Type 56 worth?)
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2015, 09:10:49 AM »
Oooo..   Now this is nice!
      
1776 will commence again if you try to take our firearms... It doesn't matter how many Lenins you get out on the street begging for them to be taken.

Online running-man

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2016 is in the record books and the Commercial gun data is catalogued.  Here's what we've got:

374 total commercial guns changing hands at an avg. price of $540.58.  Low was $245 for a so-so Paratrooper and the high was $1300 for both an SKS D (now called SKS-30) and a NA Type 84 (Now known as the "SKS Assault Carbine").

130/374 were paratroopers at $442.86 avg.
69/374 were SKS Ms at $659.01 avg.  Surprisingly pricey for how numerous and common they are.
60/374 were SKS Sporters at $569.82 avg.  On avg, ~$90 cheaper as an M. 
20/374 were SKSS at $480.45.  A bit more love over a std. paratrooper.
17/374 were SKS D (SKS-30) at $742.41 avg.  Definitely a premium there.   
10/374 were SKS NRs at $662.15.  About the same as an SKS M.

The rest didn't break double digits.

Quite a few guns in above avg condition as you'd expect from SKSs built or heavily refurbished in the late 80s and early 90s.   thumb1
      

Offline Power Surge

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Awesome job Joe, thanks for your hard work!