General Milsurp Weapons > Mauser (non-German)

Swedish Mauser

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Cz315:
I just committed to get this one

 https://www.gunboards.com/threads/wts-two-nice-swede-m96-long-rifles.1191244/

A bit more than what I wanted to pay, but it looks ok. What do you think?

1mlt:
That site wants me to sign-up. No thank you.

Phosphorus32:
I see you took #2, the 1900 CG M/96b. That was the clear winner of the two to me thumb1

From a collecting perspective: All matching metal parts thumb1 The stock has never been sanded, as indicated by the nice sharp-edged grasping grooves and the rear tang isn't sitting proud of the wood, like the 1917. 1900 is not a rare year (23K made), but I think it's an interesting year, and about 1/2 as many made as in 1917 (44K), which was the highest production year.

From a shooting perspective: The bores are nominally 6.50 (.256") when new, though some are tighter. Yours gauged at 6.53mm (.257") the last time a Swedish armorer examined it, which is really only very slightly worn when you consider that the bullets are 6.70mm (.264"). A bore corrosion rating of 2 (out of 3, "4" was replace the barrel) is still very good since Swedish armorers were very conservative in their ratings. The Swedes never used corrosive potassium chlorate primers, so they were used to looking at excellent bores.

Cz315:
Thanks, 32P!

I thought #2 was a bit more interesting but this is my first Swede so I don't know much about those. Glad to see an expert agree!

Once I get my hands on it I'll post more pics. Along with a range report. I need to read up on the use of modern ammo in those swedes. I recall reading somewhere that one needs to be careful with it.

Phosphorus32:

--- Quote from: Cz315 on May 12, 2021, 12:42:34 PM ---Thanks, 32P!

I thought #2 was a bit more interesting but this is my first Swede so I don't know much about those. Glad to see an expert agree!

Once I get my hands on it I'll post more pics. Along with a range report. I need to read up on the use of modern ammo in those swedes. I recall reading somewhere that one needs to be careful with it.

--- End quote ---

Ammo loaded to mil spec should be fine. There are a lot of modern rifles still chambered in 6.5x55mm, since it's a great round. Hunting ammo marketed for those modern guns may need to be avoided. I haven't bought any or looked into their specifications. If the ammo manufacturers have their specs available on their websites, you can check the ballistic energy vs. m/41 specs with the equation E = 0.5m*v^2 (half the mass, times velocity squared). That won't account for possible increased initial pressure build up with a heavy bullet, so you might avoid much heavier bullets too. Swedish military surplus m/41 out of the long barrel of the M/96 has a nominal velocity of 790m/s and a bullet weight of 9.0g (139gr), so the ballistic energy 2808J (Joules).  Personally, I stick with 139-142gr offerings from PPU, Norma etc. and I have quite a bit of milsurp Swedish 139gr, which like the Swiss GP11 for their rifles, is basically match grade. You can't go wrong with PPU standard or match grade ammo.

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