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Yep I agree JH . I going to start downsizing in my household but ill bet that ol Yugo smells good rofl . Just pulled the trigger on a brand new truck. So back to being a conservative  :)
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General SKS Discussion / Re: Cleaning Kit Conundrums.
« Last post by Greasemonkey on Today at 03:29:17 PM »
Would the M59/66 really need a muzzle protector/cap?

Given the actual rifling starts what, 2-2 1/2 inches down in the launcher spigot, where as "normal" SKS the rifling and crown are right there and would/could/should benefit from a muzzle protector during cleaning. Technically, on the M59/66 the barrel crown is or would be protected from haphazard lopsided cleaning rod wear and a M59/66 has the same sized butthole as a M59, so would a specific kit been issued or would they all use the same kit across the board? 

Just looking around the interweb... Brass pieces seems to favor Yugoslavia, like Justin said, the AK kits seem to have the 2 piece multitool that wouldn't have too much use on an SKS.

And a biggie, just to throw a kink in the works  :) ........ A 5.45mm cleaning kit while visually similar can be deceiving, in the WASR kit I posted above, I found the bore brush would fit and work fine, but it has a 30cal jag which is of absolutely "NO" use on the smaller caliber, it won't even fit the bore. 
So now..... maybe there is a distinct possibility of having another type of cleaning kit thrown in the mix, quite a few nations adopted the AK74 that also used the AK47. Many AK74 variants were brought into the states, along with parts, pieces, slings and cleaning kits, so it should be pretty common to find one, I know the 5.45 also has a thinner cleaning rod, but cleaning kits could just as easily be made to fit the 5.45 and could or would possibly even be backwards compatible with the 7.62. Logistically it makes sense, how do you clean your 5.45 with a 7.62 kit, you really can't, but you could easily reverse that and get the job done with one kit on two different calibered weapons, so in laymens terms it would look more like a .22 cleaning kit vs a 30 cal cleaning kit. I'm sure even the cleaning rod threaded ends were universally the same on both as well. And also, if I had to guess, the 5.45 and the limited amount of 5.56 Aks, these would also have no issues interchanging.

This is how much size difference there is between a 5.45 and 7.62...

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Yugoslavian SKS / Re: A new yugo... Sort of...
« Last post by Justin Hell on Today at 02:59:09 PM »
The Californistanlavia version....the only thing it launches is the desire to move to a state where you can have all the original features. 

Since California has such a problem with grenade attacks...and the subsequent obligatory slightly longer bayonettings.
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Yugoslavian SKS / Re: Anyone see these Long BBl M59's at Century
« Last post by Justin Hell on Today at 02:55:05 PM »
Fortunately...also too rich for the Hell Blood.

If I feel the need to compensate for anything...I probably ought to do it vehicularly.
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Hand Guns & Sub Guns / Re: Armi Galesi questions.
« Last post by Boris Badinov on Today at 02:19:35 PM »
Thanks GM--

I did encounter all of these.

But it's good to have them all on the same page for comparison.

Thanks, again.
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General SKS Discussion / Re: Cleaning Kit Conundrums.
« Last post by Justin Hell on Today at 01:20:35 PM »
I know the Russian kits never had the AK screwdriver tool....only one late Russian had one show up in it's butt...info also from Yoopers...personally, I find that to be an SKS that had its backside sullied by more than it's first piercing...

The proper kit for a 59/66 also does not have the ears on the lid, as those are meant to lock around the FSB for use as a muzzle protector which ain't happening with all that business up front....and they also are brass....those are neat to hunt down.

I can also confirm after fingering my poor Cherry's butthole that I STILL am on the hunt for one of those....scratch that...two, as my eldest Yugo has a vacant butthole...damn it.   I can confirm also that whilst diddling my Cherry's nethers...the friggin lid came off....and I can feel the damned ears on the M59 kit's lid...double damn it.  It is going to be hard to extricate that from a virgin. It is all my fault though...she came with a buttcherry....no kit....I was the fool that stuck it in backwards. banghead1

I additionally can confirm I have 25 random kits inbound....I love people who list things stupidly. It helps to pay for my habit....and might make for interesting conversation later in this thread when they arrive....

This all reminds me of a recent time when I pulled all of my spike bayonets to check for differences from year to year...only to realize through all of my bubba incarnations, I had to do patina matching to get everybody their proper prong again.
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General SKS Discussion / Re: reduntant thread deleted....
« Last post by Loose}{Cannon on Today at 12:10:16 PM »
No worries KD...  I've done it all too often myself.   Its impossible to see every thread etc.   thumb1
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Hand Guns & Sub Guns / Re: Armi Galesi questions.
« Last post by Greasemonkey on Today at 11:36:46 AM »
Just a quick lookie... :)    you may have stumbled across it, but others may want to read it.  Hey....wait.. I do have an Italian Carcano M91 thumb1 rofl

Quite abit of stuff but it's kind of hazy info in places.. no clue how much is hear say, and whats actual fact.

http://forum.pafoa.org/showthread.php?t=7688
Quote
Industria Armi Galesi, Collebeato of Brescia, Italy was founded before the First World War, and began manufacturing pistols in 1914. The first Galesi pistol was a 6.35mm-blowback design based on the Browning 1906, but without the grip safety. In 1923 improvements were made and a 7.65mm chambering was added.

In 1930, the Model 6, which was based on the Browning 1910, was introduced in 6.35mm and 7.65mm calibres. The Model 6 was striker fired, with concentric recoil spring and no grip safety, sights were a groove in the top of the slide. In 1936, a 9mm short chambering was added which was adopted in small numbers as a substitute for the standard pistol of the Italian armed forces.

In 1950, the Model 6 was overhauled, the principal change being a modification to the rear of the frame, to allow for easier slide removal. The modification became known as the Model 9 and it was produced in .22, 6.35mm and 7.65mm calibres. Hope this helps."

And this..
https://www.bevfitchett.us/firearms-identification/galesi-pistols-hlz.html


Quote
Galesi Brescia Date Code
Last Updated on Sat, 13 May 2017 | Firearms identification

These pistols are manufactured by the Industria Armi Galesi, located in Collebeato (Brescia), Italy. The firm was founded in 1910 by Nicola Galesi, the father of Giuseppe Galesi who is the present proprietor. The first pistol was made in 1914 and production continued until 1923. In 1923 (or soon thereafter) production of the second model began. This model was based on Pat. No. 219,408 issued to Nicola Galesi on March 30, 1923. Just when production was started is not known, nor is it known how many were manufactured before it gave way to the Mod. 1930. Specimens known to have been made in 1928 bear serial numbers in the 130,000 range. This pistol was of the blowback type with no particularly distinctive or outstanding features. It was produced in both 6.35 and 7.65 mm. calibers.

In 1930 a new model appeared, based on Pat. No. 297,441 issued to Nicola Galesi on June 7, 1930, and it became known as the 1930 Model. This was also made in both 6.35 and 7.65 mm. calibers until 1936, when it was also issued in 9 mm. caliber. This change did not involve any change in model nomenclature. Specimen No. 138,827 in 6.35 mm. caliber dated 1937 shows the sliding floor plate and probably is one of the last to have this feature.

The 9 mm. version of this model was made for war service and is so marked. Following the Italian surrender, possibly as early as 1944, production of the Mod. 1930 in 7.65 mm. caliber was resumed. Speciman No. 145,233 (though undated) is probably of this vintage. It has an extension of the magazine floor plate which forms a rest for the little finger, thus producing a somewhat better grip.

Following World War II (in 1950) the designation of the pistol was again changed, becoming the Mod. 9, but with no important basic changes. Specimens of the 6.35 Mod. 1930 pistols dated 1937 appear to be identical to 6.35 mm, Mod, 9 which are dated 1947, with the exception of the design of the grip plates, the use of finer serrations in the finger grips on the slide, and the slightly more streamlined grip frames on the 1947 Mod, Observed specimens of the Mod. 1930 did not have raised front and rear sights, but such are provided on some (but not all) of the 7,65 mm, Mod, 9 pistols,

The Mod. 9 is produced in ,22 Short, ,22 Long, ,22 L.R., 6,35 mm,, and 7,65 mm, calibers and in different sized models for the same caliber, Also, they are available in a profusion of finishes and grip materials for each caliber and size, In fact no less than 54 quotations appear in the price list, All Galesi pistols are numbered consecutively, each caliber having a separate numbering series irrespective of model, Up to June 1959 over 300,000 pieces had been made, including all calibers and models.

The Galesi pistols are widely advertised and apparently well known in this country and, no doubt, will continue to be so, for they are very attractive in appearance, and their stainless steel barrels should render them less likely to corrode and less subject to wearing away of the rifling.

http://oldguns.net/q&a9_03.htm
Quote
Industria Armi Galesi, Collebeato of Brescia, Italy was founded before the First World War, and began manufacturing pistols in 1914. The first Galesi pistol was a 6.35mm-blowback design based on the Browning 1906, but without the grip safety. In 1923 improvements were made and a 7.65mm chambering was added.

In 1930, the Model 6, which was based on the Browning 1910, was introduced in 6.35mm and 7.65mm calibres. The Model 6 was striker fired, with concentric recoil spring and no grip safety, sights were a groove in the top of the slide. In 1936, a 9mm short chambering was added which was adopted in small numbers as a substitute for the standard pistol of the Italian armed forces.

In 1950, the Model 6 was overhauled, the principal change being a modification to the rear of the frame, to allow for easier slide removal. The modification became known as the Model 9 and it was produced in .22, 6.35mm and 7.65mm calibres. Hope this helps.
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Hand Guns & Sub Guns / Re: Armi Galesi questions.
« Last post by Boris Badinov on Today at 10:42:52 AM »
It looks like.... if a Baby Browning and a Walther PP had a 6.35mm love child, this would be it..  thumb1

I was thinking the progeny of a Makarov and a Sterling Arms 300.

Maury? :-X
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Hand Guns & Sub Guns / Re: Armi Galesi questions.
« Last post by Boris Badinov on Today at 10:40:15 AM »
Nice and interesting pistol!   thumb1

Nica pistola!

Grazie, grazie!

Pizza, mozzarella, rigatoni bon giorno!
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